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“Great atmosphere and great dentists!" Jerry Goodwin (Milford)"

"… What a great painless experience. Very impressed with the skill and technology used at this practice…" Mark Linsenman (Highland)"


Meet the Dentists

Anna Chong-Huszti DDS
Valedictorian, OKU Honors

William Huszti DDS
BS Microbiology, BA Psych

Mark Isler DDS, MS

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Welcome to Huszti Dental Care in Milford, Michigan!

At Huszti Dental Care Dr.’s William & Anna Huszti and our phenomenal team provide individualized, leading-edge care with a personal touch. We not only take the time to develop personal relationships with our patients, but we also give thorough explanations and individual attention to each patient. Our wide array of services ensures that you will receive the treatment that is perfect for you and your lifestyle.

As we celebrate 20 years of providing dental care to our community a special thanks to all of our patients from Milford, Highland, Commerce, White Lake, Hartland, Holly and all surrounding Michigan areas. We hope you've had as much fun going to the dentist as we've had with you! It's our pleasure to care for you!


National Children's Dental Health Month

The usually reserved professionals at Huszti Dental will do ANYTHING to promote good oral health with our kids including scripting, “singing” & filming an original rap music video. Counting down the days to it's premier ( 2/10/14).

According to the National Institute of health: National Children’s Dental Health Month is meant to raise awareness about the importance of oral health.  Why is this type of celebration—and year-round attention to children’s dental health--important? Despite the fact that it’s almost entirely preventable, tooth decay is the most common chronic disease in children. More than 40 percent of children ages 2 to 11 have had a cavity in their primary (baby) teeth, and more than two-thirds of 16- to 19-year-olds have had a cavity in their permanent teeth. Although overall rates of tooth decay have decreased over the past four decades, decay has actually increased in preschool age children in recent years.

The good news is there are safe and effective preventive measures that can protect teeth. Good oral hygiene practices such as thorough brushing with a fluoride toothpaste can help keep children from getting cavities. In addition, dental sealants and community water fluoridation are two other strategies that can help prevent tooth decay.


Because nobody likes a shot

That’s why, everyday, we reach for our computerized anesthetic to keep our patients comfortable. With delicate sensors and real-time feedback computerized anesthetic provides optimum comfort. And a very different experience than the traditional syringe. Innovative technologies such as digital x-rays, laser diagnostics and computerized anesthetic enhance our treatments and insure you’re receiving the leading edge care you’ve come to expect. Whether family dentistry, cosmetic solutions or more advanced treatments  innovative care makes it easy to keep you smiling.

History: In 1844 the thumb driven syringe was hailed as a break through technology. Irish physician Francis Rynd invented the hollow needle and used it to make the first recorded subcutaneous injections. In1853 Charles Pravaz and Alexander Wood developed a medical hypodermic syringe with a needle fine enough to pierce the skin. In 1946 Chance Brothers in Smethwick, Birmingham, England produce the first all-glass syringe with interchangeable barrel and plunger, thereby allowing mass-sterilization of components without the need for matching them. In 1956 New Zealand pharmacist and inventor Colin Murdoch was granted New Zealand and Australian patents for a disposable plastic syringe.


Like us on Facebook

You asked us to go on Facebook and we’re glad we did. Our After hours activities, community events, articles, Professional events and family outings are all here. Complete with plenty of pictures, video’s and a few surprises too. It’s been a lot of fun sharing and generally hanging out. We always appreciate your feedback and the face book format makes it easier than ever before!


We're in the Newspaper!

On December 6, 2013 the Milford Times wrote ( Hometown newspaper):

International students learn at Huszti Dental

(From left) Dr. Ron Paler, Dr. Anna Chong-Huszti, dental students Gabriella Moura Chicrala and Alexander Maude Batitucci Ambrosia, and Dr. William Huszti at Huszti Dental Care in Milford. The students were visiting to learn more about American dental practices.

Brazilian dental students Alexander Maude Batitucci Ambrosia and Gabriella Moura Chicrala got a glimpse of dentistry in America, thanks to Dr. William and Dr. Anna Chong-Huszti of Huszti Dental Care in Milford.

The day’s activities included a thorough tour of the practice followed by a presentation about comfort technologies and techniques. The students received a hands-on demonstration of the various technologies within the office.

“I cannot believe something like Intraoral cameras even exist,” said Gabriella, “It’s incredible that patients can see what we see inside their mouths.”

Intraoral cameras are an important tool for diagnosing and communicating to patients, said William Huszti. The tool is a tiny video camera that allows dentists to zoom in on one tooth, and the image is displayed on a computer monitor.

“I never thought I would see an iPad in a dental office,” said Alexander, “What a great idea to provide patients with some enjoyment while in the chair.”

The 21-year-old students are both on the verge of graduation from the University of Sao Paulo.

“The entire teams at Huszti Dental Care feels very strongly about taking an active role in shaping the future of the dental profession, which starts with the students,” said Huszti.

The dentists were selected by the International College of Dentists (ICD) to represent an American model of dental care delivery. The exchange program, coordinated through the University of Michigan school of Dentistry, is a signature program at ICD and is a once in a lifetime opportunity for the students. The visit took place Nov. 20.

“It is an honor to be selected by the International College of Dental Students as a representative of dental care in America,” said Anna Chong-Huszti, “We enjoyed hosting the students very much and hope to welcome others in the future.

Oral health is a worldwide burden, 60-90 percent of school children and nearly 100 percent of adults have dental cavities, according to the World Health Organization.


Happy New Year!

It's a time for new beginnings. Looking for an easy resolution with a big impact? It's surprisingly easy to improve your smile by brushing for two minutes, twice a day. Huszti Dental also advises January resolutions should include safe winter fun & most of all time spent with friends & family!

An article from US News sheds more light on the tradition of the New Years resolution: 

The New Year is all about making resolutions. But while 45 percent of Americans say they usually make them, just 8 percent of Americans manage to keep them, according to recent data from University of Scranton researchers and the Journal of Clinical Psychology. Losing weight, getting organized, spending less and saving more are the top promises we make (and break) at the end of each year. Here are five tips for making New Year's Resolutions that you're more likely to keep.

[MORE: Be the Best You: Optimize Your Life]

Set achievable goals. Losing 25 pounds may not be within your control, but opting to eat more healthily can be. Getting a promotion may be up to your boss, but learning more transferable skills is something you can vow to do yourself. "Be real when you make a resolution," suggests Elisa Zied, a registered dietician and the author "Younger Next Week." Rather than commit to running a marathon, "Set yourself up for success and map out your course by making appointments with yourself to be active. If you treat your goals like set appointments, you're more likely to achieve them."

Reach out to others. Let your closest friends and family members in on your goals; they'll help hold you accountable, provide support when you feel your willpower starting to slip and serve as a sounding board when you need to figure out a problem. "Having a support network is crucial in achieving your goals," says Luke Landes of Consumerism Commentary.

Do unto yourself as you would do unto others. Yes, you read that correctly -- it's a twist on the Golden Rule, and something we tend to forget to do. "Consider resolving to treat yourself with just as much love and respect as you do your closest friends and relatives," Dr. Yoni Freedhoff writes at U.S. News & World Report. "Anytime you catch yourself beating up on your own normal human imperfections ... consider how you might counsel your loved ones were they in the exact same situation. Because you deserve to love and respect yourself too; no doubt, doing so will confer onto you tremendous health and life benefits."

Find ways to feel happier. Thousands of studies have shown that having an attitude of gratitude can make for positive change in your life. "Gratitude isn't passive reflection. It's active," says David DeSteno, a professor of psychology at Northeastern University in Boston. "And it's not about the past. It's there to help direct our behavior in the future." At the very least, it can make you feel happier -- and there are real physical and emotional benefits to being more upbeat. "You're 50 percent less likely to have a heart attack, you get sick less often, and you can be a lot more productive at work," points out Nataly Kogan, founder and chief happiness officer at, where community members chronicle their daily happy moments, no matter how small. With a little practice, feeling happy can become a habit (check out Kogan's 21-day Happier Courses for inspiration). And happiness is contagious. "If you're happier," Kogan says, "You'll make the people around you happier, too."

Forget resolutions; pick a theme instead. Tired of making the same resolutions year after year? Instead of focusing on "lose 10 pounds" or "hit the gym more often," pick a theme like "activity," "movement" or "fitness" and strive toward that instead. "The theme should be a word that resonates with you and embodies something that has been missing from your daily life," advises Melinda Johnson, a spokesperson for the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. "Instead of defining specific behaviors that you want to do, you simply keep your theme in mind and allow your days to unfold from there."